<html><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div>John,&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>I am open to call request artifact as something else, but I do not think it is a good idea to combine the request artifact and&nbsp;<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 15px; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); ">rpfurl as the randomness requirement is very different.&nbsp;</span><br><br>=nat @ Tokyo via iPhone</div><div><br>On 2010/04/28, at 23:25, John Bradley &lt;<a href="mailto:jbradley@mac.com">jbradley@mac.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br></div><div></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>Nat,</span><br><span></span><br><span>One simplification to consider for 7.6 may be to combine artifact and rpfurl.</span><br><span></span><br><span>If the OP has returned artifact that could be:</span><br><span>Some internal refrence ID.</span><br><span>A URL pointing to some internal reference.</span><br><span>Some compressed version of the request.</span><br><span></span><br><span>If we think of the value as a reference to the request then the rpfurl is also a reference to the request.</span><br><span></span><br><span>The only difference is that one is defined by the OP and the other by the RP.</span><br><span></span><br><span>It may be confusing for people to have two things called artifact one for the request and one for the response.</span><br><span></span><br><span>The request could be renamed to something like request_refrence </span><br><span></span><br><span>Some people may prefer them separate to make validation easier.</span><br><span></span><br><span>It is not a big thing.</span><br><span></span><br><span>John B.</span></div></blockquote></body></html>